8-Bit Nintendo Music Now!

The Greatest Bits Video Game Music DJ
The Greatest Bits Video Game Music DJ

The Greatest Bits is a video game music dj. He produces 8-bit Nintendo music remixes and other bleepy stuff.

“Sounds like Super Mario meets Daft Punk”


“The Greatest Bits releases finely mixed, loud and proud video game arrangements that knock harder than Takashi Tateishi could have ever imagined!”

(DJ Cutman on www.videogamedj.com)

Duck Tales (Woo-Hoo!)

Check out the album on Spotify, iTunes, Amazon MP3 and Google Play Music.

Duck Tales Music albumDuck Tales for the NES is one of those legendary gaming sacred cows. No one says anything negative about it, and no one gets hurt — that seems to be the general consensus, at least. For the most part, its reputation is well-deserved. Ducktales had charming visuals, a genuine respect for its source material, and some of the most responsive controls on the system. It was even popular enough to receive an official remake over 20 years after its original release.

Its soundtrack, of course, is another timeless classic. Right from the start, we were treated to one of the catchiest main themes in video game history on the title screen — imported directly from the original cartoon, mind you — that will leave anyone who hears it humming for hours.

Other notable Ducktales (Woo-hoo!) tracks include The Moon, an energetic, slightly shrill theme that nonetheless became one of the most beloved and recognizable tracks from that era of gaming, and The Himalayas, a slower, but slightly more intense track that places more emphasis on percussion and immediately brings to mind the sound of heavy snow crunching underfoot.

DuckTales is proof that even a game about cartoon ducklings can be enjoyed by any age group, and this is thanks in part to its influential and iconic soundtrack.

The title theme, The Moon and all the other NES tracks are out now on SpotifyiTunesAmazon MP3 and Google Play Music.

Sonic the Hedgehog 2 Music

Check the Sonic the Hedgehog 2 album out on iTunesSpotify and Amazon MP3.

Nowadays, it’s a bit hard to believe that Sonic the Hedgehog was once a successful and beloved franchise. Between all the terrible spin-offs and flat, unnecessary side characters that have been introduced to the series in the past few years, the appeal of the early Sonic games can easily be lost in the haze.

Sonic the Hedgehog 2 musicHowever, Sonic the Hedgehog 2 is a shining example of everything fans love (or loved) about the franchise. Widely considered to be the greatest Sonic game ever made, Sonic the Hedgehog 2 had everything you could expect from a great sequel. Improved graphics, bigger levels, a revolutionary new save system — you name it, this game probably had it.

The soundtrack, of course, is as good as ever. The Sonic franchise has always been known for its upbeat and incredibly catchy tunes composed by industry legend Masato Nakamura, and Sonic the Hedgehog 2 does not fail to deliver in that department. Compared to the original Sonic the Hedgehog, 2 gives a lot more attention to energetic guitar riffs and fast-paced percussion, but this change was not a poor decision, as it is a perfect match for the slightly more action-heavy sequel.

It’s difficult to choose which tracks were the best, but my vote goes to the Metropolis track. In a soundtrack full of pulse-pounding chiptunes, that one got my heart beating the fastest. Another favorite track is the final boss theme, which features a blaring snare drum and a rather charmingly dated synthesized orchestra.

The glory days of everyone’s favorite blue hedgehog may be over, but that doesn’t mean we can’t celebrate what we already have. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 was an instant classic. It had great action, timeless gameplay, and a wonderful soundtrack. If you’re a fan of 8-bit music and you have yet to give a listen to this little gem, take your chance now! :)

The Sonic the Hedgehog 2 album is out now on iTunesSpotify and Amazon MP3.

Final Fantasy 7 Music

Check out the Final Fantasy 7 Soundtrack tribute on SpotifyiTunesGoogle MusicAmazon MP3 and Deezer.

What could be said about it that hasn’t already been said a thousand times before? Every character, every plot point, every pixel of the game that almost single-handedly popularized the JRPG genre in the West has been scoured over by fans and detractors alike since the game’s original release almost 20 years ago.

If you’ve played a game in the past 15, 10, or even five years, you probably know everything there is to know about Final Fantasy VII. Final Fantasy 7 musicSquare Enix has been doing everything in its power to make sure we never forget what is widely regarded as their magnum opus for the past several years. With this in mind, you may be wondering why I would even bother talking about the Final Fantasy 7 music in the first place. What’s the point of talking about a game that everyone and their mother has already covered? Simply put, refusing to cover what may very well be the most beloved RPG of all time would be like compiling a list of history’s greatest artists and purposefully leaving out Leonardo da Vinci.

Though not everyone believes that Final Fantasy VII is one of the greatest games of all time, I believe we can all agree that it had a fantastic soundtrack. Series composer and all-around swell guy Nobuo Uematsu really outdid himself with the Final Fantasy VII soundtrack. From the booming electronica of the Shinra Headquarters to the sweeping overworld theme, every track is gold. And we all teared up just a little when we heard Aerith’s sad, soothing theme, right?

We shivered with equal parts uneasiness and excitement when we heard the strange, alien battle theme of the equally alien JENOVA, and who hasn’t bobbed their head to the incredibly infectious main battle theme at least once? One Winged Angel, the main theme of one of the most iconic villains of all time, still holds up amazingly well today with its booming orchestra and sinister Latin lyrics, the latter of which whose mere presence in the game was quite the technological feat at the time.

Love it or hate it, Final Fantasy VII had an undeniable impact on the gaming market in the late 90s. If not for Final Fantasy VII, JRPGs may never have caught on in the West. This is due in part to its timeless soundtrack. I tried to give this iconical video game soundtrack a special treatment. To give it a more “pop/rock band” kind of feel. A friend of mine referred to it as “Nobuo Uematsu meets Coldplay” and I think I can agree to that. I tried to preserve the epicness of the FF7 OST and give it a personal twist. I also added in some 8-bit chiptune elements as well. I can’t help it, it’s my signature touch on everything I do I guess :) Please give it a listen and let me know what you think! The full album is on SpotifyiTunesGoogle MusicAmazon MP3, Deezer and a lot of other digital music services.

Mega Man X music

Please check my renditions out on iTunesSpotifyAmazon MP3 and Google Play Music.

The early Mega Man games were fun and slightly goofy adventures built around themed stages and strategic boss fights. Mega Man X, however, reinvented the formula for the 16-bit generation with bigger levels, better graphics, and a more serious storyline and cast. Though more “mature” reimaginings of beloved family-friendly classics more often than not end in disaster, Mega Man X was an example of this trope done right. The game struck a chord with the fanbase, and remains a fan-favorite despite its contrasting nature with its NES-based brothers.

Mega Man X musicMega Man X still has the insanely catchy and energetic music of the earlier games, but here, the fast-paced beats and reverberating bass line feel far more appropriate. Right from the get-go, players are treated to the track “Awake Road”, which features a nice futuristic beat to establish the setting. “Stage Start” should be familiar to any classic Mega Man fan, as those who listen closely will discover that is is actually a remix of the boss introduction theme from earlier games. Another notable track is “Spark Mandrill“, which perfectly suits the high-speed action found in the stage’s brightly lit corridors with it adrenaline-pumping baseline and classic chiptune percussion.

Mega Man X showed us that it was perfectly okay to be serious once in a while. It still has that timeless Mega Man charm, and the soundtrack, as always, delivers spectacularly.

You can listen to the Mega Man X album on iTunesSpotifyAmazon MP3 and Google Play Music.

Sonic the Hedgehog Music

Please check my renditions out on iTunesSpotifyAmazon MP3 and Google Play Music.

In recent years, Sega’s iconic Sonic the Hedgehog series has become something of a punchline in the gaming industry. Thought the company is slowly winning back fans with its return to the classic Sonic formula, the series was in a sort of critical limbo from the late 90s to the 2000s. Sonic the Hedgehog (2006), for example, was almost legendary in its awfulness, and the deluge of annoying and unnecessary side characters found in later games was enough to turn fans off of the franchise forever.

Sonic the Hedgehog Music

However, there was a reason why Sonic ever got popular in the first place. Released on the Sega Genesis / Mega Drive in 1991, the original Sonic the Hedgehog was a cheery and fast-paced answer to Nintendo’s wildly popular Mario series, and quickly caught the attention of gamers worldwide.

Part of the game’s appeal was its equally cheery and fast-paced soundtrack, composed by Masato Nakamura of Dreams Come True fame. Though the soundtrack was fairly small for the time period (the game featured 11 background tracks and 7 incidental tracks), it introduced some of gaming’s most iconic music.

Any child playing games in 1991 had the Green Hill Zone theme drilled into their head at some point. Bright and cheery, the track is often the first piece of music people think of when asked about the series. The drowning theme – a loud and harsh, yet strangely catchy piece which plays when Sonic touches water – terrorized countless players. Another notable track is Scrap Brain Zone, which utilizes the game’s distinctive bass-heavy style most effectively.

Though Sonic’s glory days are long gone, his games consistently deliver in the music department. This goes all the way back to the game that started it all. Catchy and fun, the music of Sonic the Hedgehog set the gold standard for games of the early 1990s, and is still being enjoyed over 20 years later.

The Sonic Soundtrack tribute is available on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon MP3 and Google Play Music.

Mega Man 3

Since its original release in the fall of 1990, Mega Man 3 (also known as Rockman 3: The End of Dr. Wily) has gone down in gaming history as one of the most celebrated Nintendo Entertainment System titles of all time. Featuring new levels, new music tracks and the introduction of Mega Man’s robot dog companion, Rush, it marked the end of the original Mega Man trilogy, bringing it to a graceful conclusion before the later games were conceptualized.

Mega_Man_3Though not quite as influential (nor quite as long) as that of its older brothers, the Mega Man 3 soundtrack is still worth remembering. Its use of energetic beats, smooth synthesizers and classic chiptunes made for a truly unique and memorable album.

From its slightly somber title theme to its triumphant end credits music, the Mega Man 3 soundtrack was an instant classic. The in-game songs themselves perfectly reflected the individual stages and Robot Masters they were composed to represent.
Consider Shadow Man’s theme: fast and upbeat — perfect for a ninja flying through the night. Meanwhile, Snake Man’s theme is one of the most eerily catchy tracks in the series, hypnotic and smooth, reminiscent of an old snake charmer’s song.

Though short, Mega Man 3’s soundtrack remains a fan favorite. Composer Yasuaki Fujita really outdid himself with this title. Even if Mega Man 3 is considered the least polished of the original series when it comes to gameplay, its soundtrack is among the best,

Check it out on iTunes, Amazon MP3 and Spotify.

Pokémon Red & Blue

It’s hard to believe that almost 20 years have passed since the original release of Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue. On February 27, 1996, history was made when the first of the smash hit collect-a-thon series hit Japanese storefronts, and its massive popularity has not declined since. Dozens of games and hundreds of ‘mons later, the first Pokemon games are still considered a classic by veterans and novices alike. This is thanks, in part, to its largely chipper and energetic soundtrack.

Pokemon Red & Blue MusicWho can forget the feeling of running through endless waves of tall grass as the epic overworld score blares through their old Game Boy speakers, challenging everyone in sight to a friendly battle with the accompaniment of the classic battle theme? When battles became too overwhelming, we all sighed in relief once we heard that soothing Pokemon Center music. For both us and our ‘mons, that theme meant absolute safety.

Of course, not everything was bright in the musical world of Pokemon Red and Blue. It seems no one can talk about these games without first mentioning the Lavender Town theme, remembered for its highly unsettling, and highly pitched, chip tunes. However, even Lavender Town seemed strangely peaceful, nestled in that barren valley with nothing to distinct it from other hamlets other than its haunting music and muted purple hue.
Pokemon Red and Pokemon Blue are classics, no one can doubt that. But perhaps they wouldn’t be so fondly remembered if not for composer Junichi Masuda’s masterpiece. Though the sounds may seem antiquated to modern ears, but the soundtrack carries its own special charm, and we players wouldn’t have it any other way.

In my version of this superb soundtrack, I tried to blend the eclectic and soothing chipsounds with real instruments. To add some special vibe to the Game Boy originals.

The Pokémon Red & Blue Game Boy Classics album is available on iTunesAmazon MP3Spotify and many other digital music stores and streaming services. Have fun :)

Chrono Trigger

Chrono Trigger is a time traveler role-playing video game from the Japanese game developer Square (currently Square Enix). The game was released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) in 1995. The game is known to have one of the best video game soundtracks ever made. The overall music of the game is largely composed by Yasunori Mitsuda. However, he was also assisted by the famous Final Fantasy music composer Nobuo Uematsu for some tracks.

The music from this game inspired me to make a blend of orchestral, chiptune and “rock band” instruments. I hope to make the tracks stand even more out in a “1995 meets 2014” style of music production.

The album is available on iTunes, Amazon MP3, Spotify and many other digital music stores and streaming services. I hope you’ll enjoy it!

8-Bit NES Top 50

I’ve been working on this project for quite a while and it’s ready to see the daylight now…

It’s my personal music Top 50 from the Nintendo Entertainment System! I know there are a lot of debates on which song is the best NES song of all time, etc, but I wanted to make a Grand Tribute to the Golden NES era.

All compositions are originally from the late 80’s / early 90’s and are performed in a new way, with real drums and acoustic instruments, combined with the classic chiptune sounds we all love.

I hope this will be an album that you will enjoy listening as much as I enjoyed making it. Just something you can put on your speakers or headphones anytime you feel like it: on happy saturday evenings, lazy sunday afternoons, going to work on tuesdays etc. It’s a humble tribute to the fantastic originals.

You can listen to the tracks over here of download the album on iTunes, Amazon, Spotify and most other digital music stores and streaming services.

Volume 2, 3 and 4 will be added when they’re ready of course.

The tracklist of 8-Bit NES Top 50 Volume 1 is:

1. Duck Tales – The Moon theme

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSb1lTD4tc0?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

2. Double Dragon – Mission 1

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c4YaoejSAA?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

3. Journey to Silius – Stage 1

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXK2Tbismq8?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

4. Super Mario Bros 3 theme

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXaz9YUwV_s?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

5. Snake’s Revenge – Jungle Infiltration

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bj-s6neZ1g?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

6. Silver Surfer – Section 1

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hj1f2riJyHs?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

7. Metroid – Brinstar

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8LMxOzOHV4?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

8. Castlevania – Wicked Child

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4O_4buBNs4?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

9. The Legend of Zelda

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FqGkIO3Bcw?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

10. Blaster Master – Area 1

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-85d7HGRPA?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

11. Contra – Jungle / Hangar theme

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQIPp1JxxRI?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

12. Kick Master – The Bottomless Crevasse

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DlEoTsnkBxs?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

13. Mega Man 3 – Snake Man

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_A3DvEzY8g?hl=en"><img src="http://www.thegreatestbits.com/wp/wp-content/plugins/images/play-tub.png" alt="Play" style="border:0px;" /></a>

Ocarina of Time

The Legend of Zelda Ocarina Of Time musicThe soundtrack of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time contains many great tunes. Most of them have a classic, orchestral vibe.

On this tribute album I tried to capture the epic atmosphere of the game in a more “band style” version. So with a real drumkit instead of orchestral percussion, with an amplified bass guitar instead of a cello section, and lots of keyboard instruments.

The most classic songs are all there: the title theme, Kokiri Forest, Song of Storms, Lost Woods, Gerudo Valley and so on.

I hope you’ll enjoy the music!